beach scene

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

This is a common beach scene on the Island. This was taken as the tide was going out. The palm trees and building in the background is the beach club complete with two swimming pools, a wedding venue, beach chairs overlooking the ocean, and the Pelican’s Nest restaurant and bar.

Following is a link to a website about Seabrook Island Weddings. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption A beach photo on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

strolling on the beach

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

Today’s photo shows a couple strolling on the beach, which is a favorite past time of ours. We try to walk daily which is relaxing and good for our health.

Notice that the lady is walking barefoot.

Following is an article about the Benefits of Walking Barefoot on the Beach. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption Strolling on the beach on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

walk

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

We are headed back to Seabrook and look forward to walking on the beach. The sign shown is one of several which mark public access to the beach.

The CDC has advised that travel should not occur over Thanksgiving and to limit gathering to family living in the same house. So we have chosen to spend our holiday on the island with takeout turkey from a local deli. Just the two of use. It is our way to avoid a gathering.

Following is a link to the CDC Thanksgiving Guidance. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption Walk marker showing one of several access points to the beach at Seabrook Island, SC.

red roof

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

Today’s photo shows a red roof found on Seabrook Island. This is another example of a metal roof. Actually you can see a metal roof on the house to the left as well.

The house shown also is an a common example to two single car garages on each side of the home. I think this design such that water can flow under the house during a hurricane.

Most homes are elevated and designed for storm surge to flow under the home without knocking the home off of its foundation.

Following is an article from FIMA about Coastal Foundations and Best Practices. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption A red roof found on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

metal roof

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

Today’s photo shows a larger home project. Specifically installing a metal roof. A little research finds the following explanation:

“Unlike many other areas of the United States, coastal areas require a different type of roofing to deal with the weather of the area. Though beautiful for much of the year, coastal weather can some times be very harsh. The roofing materials, that are used on a house in a coastal area, such as West Palm Beach roofing, must be able to withstand high speed wind, salt, storms, and many other elements. The material needs to be durable enough to not fall apart under these environmental pressures.”

Following is a link to an article about the Best Types of Roofs For Coastal Areas. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption A metal roof being installed on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

painting

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

Today’s photo shows another beautiful tree in the front yard of a home on Seabrook Island. The photo also shows a fact of life that upkeep is part of owning a home. In this case the home is being painted.

They will have to use a much taller ladder to paint the eves at the top of the home.

Following is an article showing Google images of painting homes on Seabrook Island. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption Trees, homes, and upkeep on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

driveway

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

Today’s photo showing one of the longest driveways on Seabrook Island. The palm trees add a nice touch. Notice the seashells in the driveway.

A little research finds the following: “From an eco perspective, these are the best,” says Sheridan Foster, founder of Elemental Green, a green home-building and renovation resource. “There are no toxins in the shells. They are made of a renewable resource that is a waste product from the food industry.

Following is an article on the subject about The pros and cons of 6 driveway materials. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption A driveway found on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

live oak trees

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

Today’s photo shows a Live Oak tree in the front yard of a home on Seabrook Island. It impressed me the effort that was taken to save the tree. Personally, I think this was very admirable.

Actually a little research found the the Town of Seabrook Island has fairly extensive landscaping rules which include:

  • no more than thirty percent (30%) of the tree canopy of the property .. shall be removed.
  • No living tree which is twelve (12″) inches or more in diameter at a point four and one-half (4½) feet above ground level may be removed or relocated without a removal permit.

Following is a link to the municipal code ARTICLE 10. – BUFFERS, LANDSCAPING, AND TREE PROTECTION. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption Live Oak tree in the front yard of a home on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

bees

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

Today’s photo shows a sign found on Seabrook Island. We find it interesting given it represents the island’s love of wildlife. Even bees. Especially Alkali bees which are not dangerous.

Following is an article about Alkali bees.  Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption Alkali Bees are NOT dangerous. A sign found on Seabrook Island in South Carolina.

pelicans

photo taken by Denton Harryman and shared on Flickr as creative commons (CC0)

This photo shows pelicans skimming the waves off shore on Seabrook Island. A little googling finds articles that indicate “Skimming permits the birds to take advantage of an aerodynamic phenomenon known as ground effect”.

Following is an article, from Stanford University which explains skimming, why birds fly low over water. Also, a link has been included for today’s photo saved on Flickr with the caption Pelicans looking for fish offshore from Seabrook Island in South Carolina.